Native american ethnobotany. Cane (Arundinaria spp.) was one of the most important plant reso...

Ethnobotany is the study of the relationship between plants

Edible Wild Plants. A North American Field Guide to over 200 Natural Foods (Sterling Publishing, 1982), p. 139. University of Michigan. Native American Ethnobotany. A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants. Trientalis borealis ssp. Borealis. Maystar. Retrieved 30 November 2017.165 uses documented. Abnaki Food, Fruit detail... (Rousseau, Jacques, 1947, Ethnobotanique Abenakise, Archives de Folklore 11:145-182, pages 168) Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Cough Medicine detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa.Native American Authors A list provided by the IPL2 (formerly the Internet Public Library). Includes bibliographies of published works, biographical information, and links to online resources including interviews, online texts and tribal web sites. Native American Ethnobotany Database The Pluralism Project: Native American TraditionsBoth the Native Americans and the European settlers had medicinal uses for the Eastern Cottonwood. A tea from its inner bark was used for treating childbirth pains, common colds, heartburn, pertussis, scurvy, and tuberculosis. A decoction from the bark was used for treating intestinal worms. Its bark also contains salicin glucoside, aEthnobotany then developed with Jesuit missions and compilation of the first floras of American plants and their native medical uses. During the French colonial period, French botanists carried out research on the taxonomy of medicinal flora in Vietnam, which was published in the “General Flora of Indo-China” (Lecomte 1912–1937).Birchbark biting (Ojibwe: Mazinibaganjigan, plural: mazinibaganjiganan) is an Indigenous artform made by Anishinaabeg, including Ojibwe people, Potawatomi, and Odawa, as well as Cree and other Algonquian peoples of the Subarctic and Great Lakes regions of Canada and the United States.Artists bite on small pieces of folded birch bark to form intricate designs.American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) is a plant native to the deciduous forests of North America whose root is a treasured medicinal in East Asia. The harvest and trade of American ginseng has been a booming business for centuries. Even today its dried roots can fetch as much as $600 a pound. Without income provided from the ginseng …Introduction to Ethnobotany 11:776:205 (3 credits) Spring (yearly) Hybrid Format CONTACT INFORMATION Instructor: Dr. James Simon Office Location: 396C Foran Hall, 59 Dudley Rd., New Brunswick, NJ 08901 Phone: 848-932-6239 E-mail: [email protected] Office Hours: by arrangement Co-Instructor: Dr. Rodolfo JulianiThuja occidentalis, also known as northern white-cedar, eastern white-cedar, or arborvitae, is an evergreen coniferous tree, in the cypress family Cupressaceae, which is native to eastern Canada and much of the north-central and northeastern United States. It is widely cultivated as an ornamental plant. It is not to be confused with Juniperus virginiana (eastern red cedar). . Common names. Its ...He currently works as the Intertribal Food Systems Coordinator for the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin. Previously, he worked as the Community Garden Manager for his band where he focused on growing both traditional and non-traditional crops and led workshops around building relationships with plants and the land through Indigenous foods and crafts.Many are involved in the North Carolina Native American Ethnobotany Project, which collects plant knowledge from elders and shares it back with the community through blog posts, publications and local workshops. Watson encouraged the audience, in person and on Zoom, to share traditional knowledge with their children through "little lessons ...Asplenium trichomanes. Credit: Harvard University Herbaria | eFlora Home | People Search | Help | ActKey | Hu Cards | Glossary | eFlora Home | People Search | Help ...These sites and areas are referenced in a forthcoming paper on the Native American ethnobotany (cultural use) of Physalis longifolia and related species. Map 3. Physalis longifolia museum collections . Map 3 shows locations where Physalis longifolia voucher specimens are located in herbaria and botanical museums.Thuja occidentalis, also known as northern white-cedar, eastern white-cedar, or arborvitae, is an evergreen coniferous tree, in the cypress family Cupressaceae, which is native to eastern Canada and much of the north-central and northeastern United States. It is widely cultivated as an ornamental plant. It is not to be confused with Juniperus virginiana (eastern red cedar). . Common names. Its ...Ethnobotany is the study of how people of a particular culture and region make use of indigenous (native) plants. Plants provide food, medicine, shelter, dyes, fibers, oils, resins, gums, soaps, waxes, latex, tannins, and …Hardcover. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other things. Anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman has devoted 25 years to the task of gathering together the accumulated ethnobotanical knowledge on more than 4000 plants. More than 44,000 uses for these plants ...Oct 2, 2023 · Native American Ethnobotanyby Daniel E. Moerman. Publication Date: 1998. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for …The medicinal knowledge of native North American peoples is extraordinary. Just how this knowledge was developed remains a mystery. Native American peoples came from Asia; the flora of Asia is in many ways similar to that of North America (Duke and Ayensu 1985). It is quite likely that the first migrants to the New World brought with them ...Since then Native American Ethnobotany textbook received total rating of 3.8 stars and was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price of $ 24.46 or rent at the marketplace. Description. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other ...Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, page 250 Fraxinus latifolia Benth. Oregon Ash USDA FRLA: Cowlitz Drug, Anthelmintic Infusion of bark taken for worms. Gunther, Erna, 1973, Ethnobotany of Western Washington, Seattle.The WNPS Native Plant Directory goal is to provide basic information on Washington State native plants including identifying features, plant propagation and landscaping uses, ethnobotanical uses, and conservation and restoration uses. If you are interested in writing listings or submitting photos, please contact [email protected] of Western Washington. February 26, 1976, University of Washington Press. Hardcover - 2Rev Ed edition. 0295952687 9780295952680. cccc.This guide contains resources on the Menominee Tribe for you to use as you begin your research.Native American Ethnobotany by Moerman, Daniel E. Call Number: E98.B7 M66 1998 Oversize. Atlas of Medicinal Plants of Middle America : Bahamas to Yucatan by Morton, Julia Frances, 1912-Call Number: QK99.C315 M67. PDR for Herbal Medicines. Call Number: RM666.H33 P37 2007.University of Utah Press, page 62. View all documented uses for Salvia dorrii (Kellogg) Abrams. Scientific name: Salvia dorrii (Kellogg) Abrams. USDA symbol: SADOC5 ( View details at USDA PLANTS site) Common names: Grayball Sage. Family: Lamiaceae. Family (APG): Lamiaceae. Native American Tribe: Kawaiisu. Use category: Other.Botany of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Scientific Survey of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands. New York Academy of Sciences, New York. Virgin Islands. Distribution. THCA. James, S.A., and C.T. Imada (eds.). 2007. Pacific Basin vascular plant checklist. Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu.Apache, Chiricahua & Mescalero Food, Sauce & Relish. Seeds ground into flour and used to make a thick gravy. Castetter, Edward F. and M. E. Opler, 1936, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest III. The Ethnobiology of the Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4 (5):1-63, page 48.The Black Walnut Tree is a large deciduous tree native to Eastern North America. Scientifically known as Juglans Nigra, it can grow 100′ tall in optimum conditions of full sun and well-draining soil. A valuable tree to both humans and wildlife, it hosts numerous insects, produces edible nuts, and it's lumber is beautiful and valuable.The Ethnobotany Garden at the Payne Family Native American Center contains native plants, shrubs, and grasses of the Rocky Mountain West. Eight stone circles represent diverse ecoregions of Montana and the Native tribes that live there. Click on the Tribal Seals below to explore the rich histories and contemporary stories of the Indigenous ...Bella Coola Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail... (Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, pages 197) Blackfoot Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail... (Johnston, Alex, 1987, Plants and the Blackfoot, Lethbridge, Alberta. Lethbridge Historical Society, pages 17) Blackfoot Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail...Cane (Arundinaria spp.) was one of the most important plant resources for Native Americans living in the southeastern United States prior to Euro-American settlement. The use of cane permeated virtually every aspect of tribal life. Cane was used to make houses and village structures, military and hunting weapons, fishing gear, furniture and domestic implements, personal adornments, baskets ...Native Americans, also known as American Indians or Indigenous Americans, are the descendants of the original inhabitants of North and South America, prior to the arrival of European explorers and colonizers in the late 15th century. They are comprised of diverse cultural groups and tribes with distinct languages, traditions, and histories. Today, Native Americans continue […]Hardcover. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other things. Anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman has devoted 25 years to the task of gathering together the accumulated ethnobotanical knowledge on more than 4000 plants. More than 44,000 uses for these plants ...Ethnobotany lies at the intersection of culture, medicine, and mythology. The "witch doctors" and voodoo practitioners, the followers of the Afro-Cuban religion of Santeria, and the wise elders of ancient Chinese civilizations are all ethnobotanists. ... (Drosera capaillaris) uses enzymes to break down insect protein, and Native American ...Native American ethnobotany. Timber Press, Portland, Oregon. Phillips, H.R. 1985. Growing and propagating wild flowers. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Smith, H.H. 1928. Ethnobotany of the Meskwaki. Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 4(2):175-326. Tantaquidgeon, G. 1972. Folk medicine …Handsomely illustrated, this book is a valuable resource for ethnobotanists, anthropologists, historians, and anyone interested in American Indian use of native ...Information -- adapted from the same research used to create the monumental Native American Ethnobotany -- includes 82 categories of medicinal uses, ranging from analgesics, contraceptives, gastrointestinal aids, hypotensive medicines, sedatives, and toothache remedies. Native American Medicinal Plants includes extensive indexes arranged …Native American ethnobotany. Native Americans used the sap of wild trees to make sugar, as medicine, and in bread. They used the wood to make baskets and furniture. An infusion of bark removed from the south side of the tree is used by the Mohegan as cough medicine.Native American Ethnobotany is a comprehensive account of the plants used by Native American peoples for medicine, food, and other purposes. The author, anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman, has devoted more than 25 years to the compilation of the ethnobotanical knowledge slowly gathered over the course of many centuries and recorded in hundreds of firsthand studies of American Indians made over ...Ethnobotany is the study of how people of a particular culture and region make use of indigenous (native) plants. Plants provide food, medicine, shelter, dyes, fibers, oils, resins, gums, soaps, waxes, latex, tannins, and even contribute to the air we breathe. Many native peoples also use plants in ceremonial or spiritual rituals.Native American - Tribes, Culture, History: The thoughts and perspectives of indigenous individuals, especially those who lived during the 15th through 19th centuries, have survived in written form less often than is optimal for the historian. Because such documents are extremely rare, those interested in the Native American past also draw information from traditional arts, folk literature ...Ethno Botany. In the simplest of terms ethnobotany is the relationship between plants and people. And we can see this relationship around us all the time. Ethnobotany offers insight into our own culture and cultures around the world. Often thought of as addressing the past, the way people used to use the plants in their environment, ethnobotany ...Ethnobotany is the study of how people of a particular culture and region make use of indigenous (native) plants. Plants provide food, medicine, shelter, dyes, fibers, oils, resins, gums, soaps, waxes, latex, tannins, and even contribute to the air we breathe. Many native peoples also use plants in ceremonial or spiritual rituals.Since then Native American Ethnobotany textbook received total rating of 3.8 stars and was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price of $ 24.46 or rent at the marketplace. Description. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other ...D. Moerman, Native American Ethnobotany: A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American peoples Derived from Plants (2009). J.H. MacDermot, “Food and Medicinal Plants Used by the Indians of British Columbia,” Canadian Medical Association Journal (1949).Smith, Huron H., 1932, Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukee 4:327-525, page 421 View all documented uses for Pinus strobus L. Scientific name: Pinus strobus L.Native American healers, even into the early twentieth century, regularly knew the identity of 200 or 300 medicinal plants which they could readily distinguish from the 3,000 to 5,000 species which grow in any particular area. Among 100 sophisticated and well-educated modern Americans, it seems unlikely that very many could identify 200 species ...Summary This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction The Development of Ethnobotany Methods in Ethnobotany Classic Case Studies and their Contributions to Ethnobotanical Praxis Conclusion Re...Indians in Virginia Sources Title Page of A Declaration of the State of the Colony and Affaires in Virginia Victims of the 1622 Indian Attacks Scholars understand Virginia Indians of the colonial and precolonial era with the help of three main types of sources: historical, archaeological, and oral. Historical, or written, sources are the most commonly available. Read more about: Indians in ...Haisla and Hanaksiala Fiber, Snow Gear detail... (Compton, Brian Douglas, 1993, Upper North Wakashan and Southern Tsimshian Ethnobotany: The Knowledge and Usage of Plants..., Ph.D. Dissertation, University of British Columbia, pages 173) Hanaksiala Drug, Gastrointestinal Aid detail...Our Mission is "To empower creativity and leadership in Native Arts and cultures through higher education, life-long learning and outreach." ... The most recent news, press releases, and updates from the Institute of American Indian Arts. View all News. IAIA Receives Tried & True Piñon Award. Oct 10, 2023.Native Americans utilized it for ceremonial and other purposes, as an aid in teething, rheumatism, cuts, and pain. It’s also used for a variety of traditional herbal and medicinal purposes for coughs and other respiratory ailments. ... Native American Ethnobotany Database Herb to Know: Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) Photo credits: …Swank, George R., 1932, The Ethnobotany of the Acoma and Laguna Indians, University of New Mexico, M.A. Thesis, page 58 Penstemon barbatus ssp. torreyi (Benth.) Keck Torrey's Penstemon USDA PEBAT: Navajo Drug, Diuretic Infusion of plants taken as a diuretic. Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM.D. Moerman, Native American Ethnobotany: A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American peoples Derived from Plants (2009). J.H. MacDermot, “Food and Medicinal Plants Used by the Indians of British Columbia,” Canadian Medical Association Journal (1949).In Native American Medicinal Plants, anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman describes the medicinal use of more than 2700 plants by 218 Native American tribes. Information--adapted from the same research used to create the monumental Native American Ethnobotany--includes 82 categories of medicinal uses, ranging from analgesics, contraceptives ...Toggle navigation Native American Ethnobotany DB. Home; Search Uses; Tribes; Species; About; Contact; Tribe: Cherokee Documented uses 3313 uses documentedethnobotany, systematic study of the botanical knowledge of a social group and its use of locally available plants in foods, medicines, clothing, or religious rituals. Rudimentary drugs derived from plants used in folk medicines have been found to be beneficial in the treatment of many illnesses, both physical and mental. The ethnobotany of prehistoric cultures is …34 uses documented. Algonquin, Quebec Food, Bread & Cake detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series Number 65, pages 83)Apocynum cannabinum (dogbane, amy root, hemp dogbane, prairie dogbane, Indian hemp, rheumatism root, or wild cotton) is a perennial herbaceous plant that grows throughout much of North America—in the southern half of Canada and throughout the United States.It is poisonous to humans, dogs, cats, and horses. All parts of the plant are toxic and can cause cardiac arrest if ingested.Since its original publication in 1945, this small classic has acquired a new audience concerned with living in harmony with the environment and interested in the particularly intimate relationship of Native Americans to the land. This survey of the use of plants by Native Americans in western Washington describes the ways in which more than 150 species served as food and medicine, and were ...Description. Hackberry trees usually grow to a height of 30 to 40 feet and to a trunk diameter of 1 to 2 feet, though these trees can be much larger. The best way to identify a hackberry tree is by its warty, gray to brown bark. Hackberry trees have egg-shaped leaves that taper to a point that are 2.3 to 4 inches long and 1.5 to 2 inches wide.Look around our blog to learn more about Native American culture and be sure to check out our beautiful collection of handcrafted jewelry, pottery, and more adorned with the Healing Hand. For more information give us a call at 800-304-3290 or come visit us at our shop at 2920 Hopi Drive in Sedona! Healing Hand Jewelry Native American Healing ...Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 197. Abies amabilis (Dougl. ex Loud.) Dougl. ex Forbes. Pacific Silver Fir. USDA ABAM. Bella Coola Drug, Throat Aid. Liquid pitch mixed with mountain goat tallow and taken for sore throat. Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the ...Throughout the next two decades, ethnobotany graduate students, research assistants and work study students continued to add entries to the file under the guidance of Ford. By the time ... (Native American) groups and Spanish speaking communities in the greater Southwest. Second, it contains published and unpublished original plant source ...Alaska Native Food, Fruit. Berries used for food. Heller, Christine A., 1953, Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska, University of Alaska, page 97. Rubus parviflorus Nutt. Thimbleberry. USDA RUPAP2. Bella Coola Food, Preserves. Berries cooked with wild raspberries and other fruits into a thick jam, dried and used for food.Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium. Fireweed. USDA CHANA2. Bella Coola Drug, Dermatological Aid. Poultice of roasted and mashed roots applied to boils. Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 207. Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium.Cultural context Yup'ik "medicine man exorcising evil spirits from a sick boy" in Nushagak, Alaska, 1890s. In the ceremonial context of Indigenous North American communities, "medicine" usually refers to spiritual healing. Medicine men/women should not be confused with those who employ Native American ethnobotany, a practice that is very common in a large number of Native American and First ...The Malecite, Micmac, and Montagnais tribes of North America used pickerelweed as a contraceptive (Moerman 1998: 427). Recipes. See Medve and Medve (1990: 107) for some non-indigenous recipe ideas. ... 1998 Native American ethnobotany. Portland, Or.: Timber Press. Traditional Indigenous Foods History of Traditional Tribal Foods Foods Indigenous ...Bella Coola Food, Special Food. Berries formerly mixed with melted mountain goat fat and served to chiefs at feasts. Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 204. Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng. Kinnikinnick.Ethnobotany is the study of how people of a particular culture and region make use of indigenous (native) plants. Plants provide food, medicine, shelter, dyes, fibers, oils, resins, gums, soaps, waxes, latex, tannins, and even contribute to the air we breathe. Many native peoples also use plants in ceremonial or spiritual rituals.Native American Religions: Advice for people researching traditional Cherokee religion and other American Indian spirituality. Cherokee Sacred Colors Seven Ceremonies Cherokee Death Traditions Four Wind Messengers: Articles on Cherokee ceremony and traditional beliefs. Cherokee Herbs Cherokee Medicine and Ethnobotany: Articles on Cherokee ...The American beautyberry is a woody, deciduous, perennial shrub that produces showy purple fruits in the fall. It is a member of the Lamiaceae (mint) family and is native to the central and southeastern United States, Bermuda, and Cuba. ... Uses (Ethnobotany): Native Americans use the roots, leaves, and branches to treat malaria and rheumatism ...Mentzelia multiflora grows to about 2–2.5 feet (0.61–0.76 m) tall. It has shiny white stems and numerous branches. Its sticky, bright green leaves are covered with hairs containing minute barbs. The flowers are around 5 cm (2.0 in) in diameter, are yellow in colour and normally have ten petals. The flowers open in late afternoon and close ...Ethnobotany is the study of human uses of plants. People have engaged in a relationship with medicinal, edible, and otherwise useful native plants. The native plants on this tour have known uses as medicines, tools, clothes, dyes, religious instruments and, of course, foods. In discussing the many potential uses and ways of interacting with ...Ethnobotany then developed with Jesuit missions and compilation of the first floras of American plants and their native medical uses. During the French colonial period, French botanists carried out research on the taxonomy of medicinal flora in Vietnam, which was published in the “General Flora of Indo-China” (Lecomte 1912–1937).ETHNOBOTANY. ETHNOBOTANY. Ethnobotany is the study of the relationship between people and plants. This interdisciplinary field includes studying plants as wild foods and as agricultural crops; as constructs for houses and modes of transportation; as baskets, pottery, and art; as clothing and types of weaving; as medicines and alternative methods for healing; and in the context of cultural ...Gosiute Food, Fruit detail... (Chamberlin, Ralph V., 1911, The Ethno-Botany of the Gosiute Indians of Utah, Memoirs of the American Anthropological Association 2 (5):331-405., pages 381) Lakota Food, Dried Food detail... (Kraft, Shelly Katheren, 1990, Recent Changes in the Ethnobotany of Standing Rock Indian Reservation, University of North ...(Gunther, Erna, 1973, Ethnobotany of Western Washington, Seattle. University of Washington Press. Revised edition, pages 39) Clallam Fiber, Canoe Material detail... (Fleisher, Mark S., 1980, The Ethnobotany of the Clallam Indians of Western Washington, Northwest Anthropological Research Notes 14(2):192-210, pages 197) Clallam Food, Dried Food ...Native American Ethnobotany by Moerman, Daniel E. Call Number: E98.B7 M66 1998 Oversize. Atlas of Medicinal Plants of Middle America : Bahamas to Yucatan by Morton, Julia Frances, 1912-Call Number: QK99.C315 M67. PDR for Herbal Medicines. Call Number: RM666.H33 P37 2007.Engravings by the. SCHROEDER ENGRAVING COMPANY. Milwaukee, Wis. Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians. Page 6. CONTENTS. Page.Both the Native Americans and the European settlers had medicinal uses for the Eastern Cottonwood. A tea from its inner bark was used for treating childbirth pains, common colds, heartburn, pertussis, scurvy, and tuberculosis. A decoction from the bark was used for treating intestinal worms. Its bark also contains salicin glucoside, a. Native American ethnobotany. Timber Press, PoETHNOBOTANY - Historical Use By Native Americans. Ethnobotany of Download Native American Ethnobotany Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other things. Anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman has devoted 25 years to the task of gathering together the accumulated ethnobotanical knowledge on more ...Native Americans were sometimes enslaved alongside Africans, and some Native American towns sheltered people seeking freedom from slavery. ... Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002. Pg. 63-65. Native American Ethnobotany: A database of plants used as drugs, foods, dyes, fibers, and more, by Native Peoples of North America. http ... (Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Pa Below is a list of all tribes in the database. «. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. ».Species native elsewhere have other common names such as New Jersey tea for C. americanus, as its leaves were used as a black tea substitute during the American Revolution. [2] [13] In garden use, most are simply called by their scientific names or an adaptation of the scientific name, such as 'Maritime ceanothus' for C. maritimus . Floridata is an online Encyclopedia of Plants a...

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